August 12, 2013

Publishing Accomplishments

Posted in Editing, Freelance Career, Publishing, Self-Publishing tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

I titled this post “Publishing Accomplishments,” not because I want to share mine, but because I want to help you with yours. Are you a writer? Do you dream of getting your book published? If so, my freelance business, “Christine Rice Publishing Services,” can help you get published, whether your goals are to be traditionally published or self-published. The services I offer will help you during every step of the publishing process. If your goal is to get your book out to the world through the self-publishing medium, I can help you by editing and proofreading your book, formatting your book for print or digital publishing, and designing your book cover. Or, if you’re dying to get a publishing contract with a traditional publisher, I will edit your manuscript so that it will be in tip-top shape; write you a stunning query letter, synopsis, and/or book proposal; and format your manuscript how agents want them (I will even tailor the materials for the agents you wish to submit to since their submission guidelines vary – but you don’t need to worry about that, because I’ll do it all for you!).

Visit Christine Rice Publishing Services to view my resume, review my portfolio, learn what services I offer, and read my client testimonials. You will see that I am the best answer for all your publishing needs. Leave me a message on the “contact me” form on my website and I’ll get back to you right away.

Looking forward to helping you accomplish your publishing goals!

Christine

July 24, 2013

Review of “How to Write an Essay”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

How to Write an EssayHow to Write an Essay by Scribendi.com is such a helpful book for writing an excellent essay. It gives practical tips on writing a quality essay in a short amount of time. It is a good teaching tool for writing an essay now and in the future. The tips will allow you to write an essay immediately and will stay with you forever. The tips are so helpful. Some are refreshers, but most are innovative; all are spot-on for writing a winning essay.

The essay writing tips are geared for new college students, but anyone who struggles with writing an essay can benefit from the suggestions in this book. The book is well-written and organized so that you can write an essay from scratch. Five steps to writing an essay are explained in this book. The steps are simple and logical, so that anyone can apply them. The steps involve: getting instructions, researching, organizing, writing, and revising. The steps are explained thoroughly, so that you can write a superb essay, and there are also time-saving tips if you are short on time. The information provided is designed to help you earn an “A” on your essay.

In addition to the five steps of essay writing, there is a bonus section on how to make your essay stand out. This section gives tips on improving your writing technique so that your teacher will favor your essay amongst all the other students’ essays, so that your essay will earn a better grade and you’ll be at the top of your class.

How to Write an Essay is such an invaluable resource that is worth your time reading. It is a concise book that you can read in one sitting, but it’s jam-packed with priceless insight. The tips and techniques in this book will allow you to write an excellent essay in a short amount of time. This book will save you time on essay writing, and you’ll earn great grades to boot.

It’s definitely worth the read, and I highly recommend it. If you need to write an essay, you should pick up your copy now, which you can get here.

July 4, 2013

Review of “How to Write a Letter”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , at 7:52 am by Christine Rice

How to Write a LetterHow to Write a Letter, by Scribendi.com, is a resourceful read that explains all the intricacies of writing a letter. It covers everything you need to know to create a well-composed and structured letter that is appropriate for the audience and circumstance.

In addition to elaborating on all the correct methods of composing a letter, the book provides details for different types of letters, such as acceptance letters, complaint letters, confirmation letters, cover letters, and many others. Every type of letter you could possibly think of are included in this book.

Furthermore, after the explanations of each letter type, there is at least one sample letter, so that you can see how to apply the tips for the specific letter, which will help you when you write your own letter.

How to Write a Letter mentions both handwritten and digital letters. Letter writing is not a thing of the past! This book recognizes that, because its tips are not just for old-fashioned letter writing – although, it does say that letters written in long hand are still best for certain circumstances. This book tells you the right medium to use for each type of letter.

This book is very thorough in covering the topic at hand, and I guarantee that you will not have any questions remaining after you’ve finished the reading. While it provides just enough material and details to completely express the strategies of letter writing, it doesn’t bog you down with unnecessary information. Your time will not be wasted from this reading.

I highly recommend How to Write a Letter to everyone, because we all need to write letters, most of us daily. This book is invaluable for composing emails, love letters, letters of apology, and more. This is a great staple to add to your bookshelf. I’m sure I’ll refer back to it time and time again. Great read!

You can get your own copy of How to Write a Letter here. You will be glad you invested in this resourceful book! Happy reading!

June 26, 2013

Interview with Carla Woody

Posted in Interviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

Carla WoodyCarla Woody has been mentoring people toward conscious living for more than twenty years. In 1999 she established Kenosis LLC to serve human potential and support the vision: “One tribe, one world.” In 2007, she founded Kenosis Spirit Keepers, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, to help preserve indigenous wisdom ways. Carla is the author of Portals to the Vision Serpent, Standing Stark: The Willingness to Engage and Calling Our Spirits Home: Gateways to Full Consciousness. She also writes articles related to personal growth, natural healing and advocacy of Native traditions, and is a fine artist. She makes her home near Prescott, Arizona.

Christine: How long have you been a writer?

Carla: I’ve been writing off and on since childhood. The first story I can remember writing was called The Empty-Treed Forest. Looking back, this was an environmental piece somewhat strange for a seven-year-old to produce. As a teenager I wrote bad protest poetry, and then set creative writing aside for a long time in favor of the academic reports and theses necessary to acquire degrees. In the early 1990s I picked up the pen again to start writing articles and books in earnest.

Christine: What types of writing do you do?

Carla: The themes have to do with spiritual evolution, natural healing, indigenous cultures, and advocacy related to Native wisdom traditions in danger of decimation. I cover these subjects in journal and magazine articles, as well as narrative nonfiction and fiction books.

Christine: Are you solely a writer or do you have multiple occupations?

Carla: I view my books and articles as vehicles for my lifework, a way folks can be introduced or as an adjunct to my programs. For more than twenty years I’ve been mentoring people toward conscious living. In 1999 I founded Kenosis LLC to support human potential through travel journeys working with Native spiritual leaders and healers in Peru, Mexico, Guatemala and the USA, and mentoring programs integrating Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and sacred world traditions. Then in 2007 I established Kenosis Spirit Keepers, its 501(c)3 nonprofit extension, to help preserve indigenous lifeways through various projects.

Christine: What is your writing experience?

Carla: I have a passion for expression. That’s why I find it so important to, as much as possible, integrate some form of it into my everyday life and live through deeply held values. There were too many years I didn’t do that and felt cut off, which—of course—is how I came to do the work I do with others. In particular, writing and artwork are how I work things out internally and keep the creative juices flowing.

Christine: What have you published recently?

Portals to the Vision SerpentCarla: Portals to the Vision Serpent was just released on June 17, 2013. It’s a coming-of-age novel—a Hero’s Journey—that takes the reader into the realms of shamanism and the Maya world as a young man searches for his lineage and missing father. Interwoven are the struggles of indigenous peoples to preserve their way of life and tragedies that often come from misunderstandings. It’s basically a book about spiritual healing. Readers are likely to see themselves in various ways, the same as reported to me from readers of my nonfiction books Standing Stark: The Willingness to Engage (2004) and Calling Our Spirits Home: Gateways to Full Consciousness (2000).

My article The Last Spirit Keeper was published in Sacred Fire Magazine in November 2012, Issue 16, about the last Lacandón Maya elder in the rainforest of Chiapas, Mexico still maintaining his traditions against great pressure. My article Acts of Creation was just accepted by Stone Voices, a spiritually oriented, literary arts journal, no date on publication yet.

Christine: What is a typical day like for you as a writer?

Carla: I’m definitely a morning person and have a ritual that sets my day. I usually get up before dawn, feed the cats, have a cup of coffee, and meditate for 20-30 minutes. I’ve been doing it, in that order, for nearly thirty years. Then I start writing if I have a project, or other work. Several years ago I put Joseph Campbell’s writing practice in place: at least three hours a day. It became automatic, and often the time extends itself without me noticing.

Christine: What interests you about writing fiction?

Carla: I’m most interested in teaching stories. The reader learns or resolves something themselves through identifying with different characters, in the course of being entertained. As the writer, the same is true for me. The process is magical to me. It’s like a movie unfolds in front of me, and I just write it down. It’s particularly surprising when a new character appears to take me somewhere I hadn’t imagined.

Christine: How do you come up with an idea for a new novel?

Carla: The ideas present themselves. It may be something I want to explore myself, or a point I want to get across. Right now I’ve got two different ideas vying for my attention, both well developed. I’m not yet sure which one will win out to focus on first. It would be great to be able to split myself in two!

Christine: Are you traditionally published or self-published? Why did you choose that path?

Carla: I’ve published articles through professional journals and magazines since the early 1990s. When it came to my books, I specifically chose to self-publish through Kenosis Press, my own small press, for these important reasons: 1) they never go out of print; 2) the publishing process is truncated; 3) I have control over the content. Since my books are vehicles for my work, I continue to feel this is important.

Christine: Where can we find your books and websites?

Carla: Find Portals to the Vision Serpent, Standing Stark, and Calling Our Spirits Home on Amazon, or order through local bookstores.

Please note that I donate 10% of profits from book sales to Kenosis Spirit Keepers, the 501(c)3 nonprofit I founded to help us with our projects to preserve Native traditions.

You’re invited to visit Kenosis and Kenosis Spirit Keepers to learn more about offerings and sign up for free material and the Kenosis Inspirations ezine. Follow my blog The Lifepath Dialogues.

Christine: Thanks so much for joining us today, Carla. Your work and your books sound so interesting. Best of luck with your articles and books.

June 3, 2013

Interview with Carrie Golden

Posted in Interviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

Carrie GoldenCarrie was born in a small city of Plattsburgh near the border of Quebec, Canada and grew up in the Adirondack Mountains. She now lives near Raleigh, NC with her husband and son, and a small cat farm.

Christine: How, and when, did you decide to become a writer?

Carrie: As a girl, I pretty much lived in my imaginary worlds. I felt like an outsider; different from the others mainly because of my hearing disability and my strange accent. The problem was I tended to act out whatever went through my mind. One time this landed me in the ER. When I was in 5th grade, a good friend and I decided, just for fun, to see who could write the best short story. From this single experience I discovered another way (safer too!) of bringing things to life. Writing changed everything for me. Since then, it helped me to stay out of the ER!

Christine: What types of writing do you do?

Carrie: I like to write different types especially micro-poetry, short stories, screenplays, and web novels.

Christine: Are you solely a writer or do you have multiple occupations?

Carrie: One day I’d love to be able to stay home and write on a full-time basis; in the meantime, I work in the banking industry as a Loan Servicing Specialist so my husband can complete his Engineering degree.

Christine: What do you like to read?

Carrie: I enjoy reading apocalyptic types of books that have elements of fantasy in them (books written by Terry Brooks for example).

Christine: What genre do you write, and why?

Carrie: I tend to write cross-genre. My favorite is blending Fantasy with Horror while sprinkling in a bit of Science Fiction. I primarily do this because I don’t like being confined to one genre.

Christine: Where can we find your published writing?

Carrie: I have several short works published on Piker Press as well as Zombie Poetry and Literature for Kids

Christine: What seems to be the recurring theme(s) in your writing?

Carrie: Death and hopelessness as well as hope and faith. I like to include most if not all of these in my stories. No matter how bleak things get, if you just hang on, there is an end to this darkness and misery. The light is just around the next corner.

Christine: Where can we find you on the Web?

Carrie: On Twitter or on my writing blog A writer and her adolescent muse.

Thanks so much for interviewing on my blog today, Carrie. Good luck with your writing and your writing career.

April 27, 2013

Interview with Stephen Brayton

Posted in Interviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:00 am by Christine Rice

Stephen BraytonStephen L. Brayton owns and operates Brayton’s Black Belt Academy in Oskaloosa, Iowa. He is a Fifth Degree Black Belt and certified instructor in The American Taekwondo Association.

He began writing as a child; his first short story concerned a true incident about his reactions to discipline. During high school, he wrote for the school newspaper and was a photographer for the yearbook. For a Mass Media class, he wrote and edited a video project.

In college, he began a personal journal for a writing class; said journal is ongoing. He was also a reporter for the college newspaper.

During his early twenties, while working for a Kewanee, Illinois radio station, he wrote a fantasy-based story and a trilogy for a comic book.

He has written numerous short stories – both horror and mystery.

His first novel, Night Shadows (Feb. 2011), concerns a Des Moines homicide investigator teaming up with a federal agent to battle creatures from another dimension. His second book, Beta (Oct. 2011), was the debut of Mallory Petersen and her search for a kidnapped girl. In August 2012, the second Mallory Petersen book, Alpha, was published. This time she investigates the murder of her boyfriend.

Christine: How long have you been a writer?

Stephen: Well, I can’t claim I was a writer right from the womb, but soon afterward. ‘Soon’ being a relative term, of course. I loved books from an early age, and one day I thought that with all of the books I’d read, mysteries and science fiction and horror, I’d like try my hand at writing some stories. I created a character called Sam P. Petersen who lived in the Quad Cities (where I spent my early years) and worked for the East Moline Police Department. I wrote short stories featuring him. Those were my first attempts at short story writing and character profiling. From the time I started talking about writing, my parents encouraged me to continue creating stories. I wrote during college and became serious in the late-90s.

Christine: What have you published recently?

Stephen: Well, my last book, Alpha, was published in August of 2012, but my most recent publication has been the first part of a serialized short story called “White Belt Weapons” in Taekwondo Times magazine. The March issue published an interview with me as a ‘Person of Interest,’ and the May issue began what I hope to be a long-term relationship with them on short stories.

Christine: Are you solely a writer or do you have multiple occupations?

Stephen: I’m a Fifth Degree Black Belt and own and operate a taekwondo club in Oskaloosa; plus, I have a full-time job. I have to find time to write during the slow hours or days off.

Christine: What is a typical day like for you as a writer?

Stephen: Depends on the day. My schedule is never the same from week to week. I could work weekends or nine nights in a row. Usually, I’m on the graveyard shift from 11-7; sleep until the middle of the afternoon; class on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings; back to work at 11. During the night, I have plenty of time to write. On days off or afternoons, I may head outside to write or fish or visit family. I wish I could tell you I was an international spy in a different locale every day… At least the travel part sounds fun.

Christine: What is the title of your most recently published novel and a description of it?

AlphaStephen: Alpha is about Mallory Petersen, a Fourth Degree Black Belt in taekwondo and private investigator in Des Moines, Iowa. Usually her cases involve the oddballs of society, but every now and then she takes on a serious investigation. In this book, she’s relating a story to her current boyfriend about her involvement in the investigation of the murder of her previous boyfriend. Along with that case, she’s also searching for a missing woman.

Christine: What are your favorite characters that you have created? Tell us about them.

Stephen: Of course I’m in love with Mallory. Six feet tall, blonde, blue eyes, drop dead gorgeous, excellent martial artist and instructor, strong, independent, quirky sense of humor, and a romantic.

I know an author is supposed to know almost everything about all the characters, but I’m still discovering things about Mallory’s office manager Darren. Currently, he doesn’t have a last name. That issue will be solved in the next book. He’s enigmatic, quiet, loyal, and always seems to know where Mallory is and what she’s doing. This drives her crazy sometimes.

Christine: Where can we find your novels?

Stephen: Alphawww.amazon.com/Alpha-Stephen-L-Brayton/dp/1610091159
Beta (Mallory’s introduction. Ebook only) – www.amazon.com/Beta-Mallory-Petersen-Mystery-ebook/dp/B005UHEWPC
Night Shadows (eBook only) – www.amazon.com/Night-Shadows-ebook/dp/B004O0VD1M

Christine: Who are your favorite authors?

Stephen: Ellery Queen – I think I’ve read almost every one of his mysteries.
Erle Stanley Garnder – Ditto.
H. P. Lovecraft – The master.
Clark A. Smith – A close second to Lovecraft.
Elaine Viets – She helps inspire my humorous creativity.
Sparkle Abbey – Who doesn’t like dog and cat mysteries?
Robert Pobi – A true genius with words.
Frank Kane, Carter Brown, Day Keene, (and others in the same genre) – Pulp fiction mysteries. I really enjoy the flavor of these stories.

Christine: Where can we find you on the Web?

Stephen: Website – www.stephenbrayton.com
Blog – www.stephenbrayton.wordpress.com
Book Review Blog – www.braytonsbookbuzz.wordpress.com
I’m also on Facebook and Twitter (@SLBrayton).

March 26, 2013

Freelance Writing, Editing, and Formatting

Posted in Freelance Career tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:27 am by Christine Rice

Hello, everyone.

I’ve been doing well and have been quite busy with my freelance writing, editing, and formatting career. I recently did some work on my website. I added two new pages (“books” and “testimonials“). I also did some minor adjustments throughout and to the “services” page.

I’ve also been in touch with clients I’ve worked with in the past. It was a pleasure to reconnect with them. I’ve also been doing several book formatting projects and a cover design project, which has been fun. I love working with clients and doing what I love to do – write, edit, and format for others – because I like to help people and I love being involved in the publishing industry. I also love connecting with other writers and authors on Facebook and Twitter.

What have you been up to lately? What goals do you have and what have you accomplished recently? Feel free to include links to your writing, career websites, and social networking pages in the comments below. I look forward to hearing from you.

Have a joyous day!

Christine

March 11, 2013

Seven/Seven Blog Challenge!

Posted in Books, Writing tagged , , , , , , , , , at 8:00 am by Christine Rice

Hello fellow readers and writers!

I was graciously asked by B B Shepherd to participate in an author blog challenge. It’s called the “seven/seven blog challenge” and it sounds like a great opportunity to share my work-in-progress, Chronicles of a Troubled Girl, with you! Before I do, here are the details of the blog challenge:

1. Choose seven lines from page 7 or 77 of your current work-in-progress.

2. Invite seven other writers to post the same and link back to you.

3. Mention and link back to the person who nominated you.

Here is a little background on my book: Chronicles of a Troubled Girl is a compilation of all of my journal entries from childhood to age 30. It shares my thoughts, emotions, and life experiences during a rocky time in my life. So, without further ado, here are seven lines from page 77 of the first draft of Chronicles of a Troubled Girl:

What I think I am living is really just a long dream my soul is remembering. But how do I know anything about life? What am I supposed to think of life? How am I supposed to perceive it? It is so complicated and I may never even find out in the end.

Who are the intelligent ones? Who is real? Who are my friends? These are all unstable, because they are always changing. I think something is something, but it turns out to be another, so I never know what I am facing in life. I hate instability. I want little or no pain. I am killing myself. Who am I? Who are these people around me?

The first draft of this book has been completed and next I’ll be proofreading it. It won’t be long before it’s published! I’ll definitely let you know when it is!

So far, Amanda R. Dollak will be participating in the challenge. If you would like to participate too, comment below and I’ll add a link to your blog to this post.

Have a great day and keep writing!

Christine

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