August 26, 2013

Book updates

Posted in Books, Publishing, Self-Publishing tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

I have some exciting news to report. I’ve been spending much more time on my books lately. One week ago, I republished my four books with Kindle Direct Publishing and Smashwords. I worked on the formatting all day for three days to improve the look and readability. I also designed new covers for some.

I also republished my books with CreateSpace as smaller-sized paperbacks with attractive interior and exterior styling. However, the paperbacks are not ready yet. I’ve been making edits to them to make sure they look great, and each edit delays the process by at least a day. Right now I’m waiting to hear back from the CreateSpace staff about the covers, because they did not come out the same as the document I uploaded.

But my ebooks are all set and live at Amazon and Smashwords. In the near future, my books will be available in paperback from Amazon, and at Barnes & Noble (Nook), Apple iBookstore, Sony, and Kobo. Below are pictures of the book covers and links to the books:

Poetry for the Heart CreateSpace

Amazon (Kindle)
Smashwords

Essays for the Soul Cover

Amazon (Kindle)
Smashwords

My Not-So-Oridinary Life CreateSpace

Amazon (Kindle)
Smashwords

Freelance Writing Guide Ebook

Amazon (Kindle)
Smashwords

You can visit the websites to learn more about the books.

Have a wonderful day,

Christine

August 12, 2013

Publishing Accomplishments

Posted in Editing, Freelance Career, Publishing, Self-Publishing tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

I titled this post “Publishing Accomplishments,” not because I want to share mine, but because I want to help you with yours. Are you a writer? Do you dream of getting your book published? If so, my freelance business, “Christine Rice Publishing Services,” can help you get published, whether your goals are to be traditionally published or self-published. The services I offer will help you during every step of the publishing process. If your goal is to get your book out to the world through the self-publishing medium, I can help you by editing and proofreading your book, formatting your book for print or digital publishing, and designing your book cover. Or, if you’re dying to get a publishing contract with a traditional publisher, I will edit your manuscript so that it will be in tip-top shape; write you a stunning query letter, synopsis, and/or book proposal; and format your manuscript how agents want them (I will even tailor the materials for the agents you wish to submit to since their submission guidelines vary – but you don’t need to worry about that, because I’ll do it all for you!).

Visit Christine Rice Publishing Services to view my resume, review my portfolio, learn what services I offer, and read my client testimonials. You will see that I am the best answer for all your publishing needs. Leave me a message on the “contact me” form on my website and I’ll get back to you right away.

Looking forward to helping you accomplish your publishing goals!

Christine

June 26, 2013

Interview with Carla Woody

Posted in Interviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

Carla WoodyCarla Woody has been mentoring people toward conscious living for more than twenty years. In 1999 she established Kenosis LLC to serve human potential and support the vision: “One tribe, one world.” In 2007, she founded Kenosis Spirit Keepers, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, to help preserve indigenous wisdom ways. Carla is the author of Portals to the Vision Serpent, Standing Stark: The Willingness to Engage and Calling Our Spirits Home: Gateways to Full Consciousness. She also writes articles related to personal growth, natural healing and advocacy of Native traditions, and is a fine artist. She makes her home near Prescott, Arizona.

Christine: How long have you been a writer?

Carla: I’ve been writing off and on since childhood. The first story I can remember writing was called The Empty-Treed Forest. Looking back, this was an environmental piece somewhat strange for a seven-year-old to produce. As a teenager I wrote bad protest poetry, and then set creative writing aside for a long time in favor of the academic reports and theses necessary to acquire degrees. In the early 1990s I picked up the pen again to start writing articles and books in earnest.

Christine: What types of writing do you do?

Carla: The themes have to do with spiritual evolution, natural healing, indigenous cultures, and advocacy related to Native wisdom traditions in danger of decimation. I cover these subjects in journal and magazine articles, as well as narrative nonfiction and fiction books.

Christine: Are you solely a writer or do you have multiple occupations?

Carla: I view my books and articles as vehicles for my lifework, a way folks can be introduced or as an adjunct to my programs. For more than twenty years I’ve been mentoring people toward conscious living. In 1999 I founded Kenosis LLC to support human potential through travel journeys working with Native spiritual leaders and healers in Peru, Mexico, Guatemala and the USA, and mentoring programs integrating Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and sacred world traditions. Then in 2007 I established Kenosis Spirit Keepers, its 501(c)3 nonprofit extension, to help preserve indigenous lifeways through various projects.

Christine: What is your writing experience?

Carla: I have a passion for expression. That’s why I find it so important to, as much as possible, integrate some form of it into my everyday life and live through deeply held values. There were too many years I didn’t do that and felt cut off, which—of course—is how I came to do the work I do with others. In particular, writing and artwork are how I work things out internally and keep the creative juices flowing.

Christine: What have you published recently?

Portals to the Vision SerpentCarla: Portals to the Vision Serpent was just released on June 17, 2013. It’s a coming-of-age novel—a Hero’s Journey—that takes the reader into the realms of shamanism and the Maya world as a young man searches for his lineage and missing father. Interwoven are the struggles of indigenous peoples to preserve their way of life and tragedies that often come from misunderstandings. It’s basically a book about spiritual healing. Readers are likely to see themselves in various ways, the same as reported to me from readers of my nonfiction books Standing Stark: The Willingness to Engage (2004) and Calling Our Spirits Home: Gateways to Full Consciousness (2000).

My article The Last Spirit Keeper was published in Sacred Fire Magazine in November 2012, Issue 16, about the last Lacandón Maya elder in the rainforest of Chiapas, Mexico still maintaining his traditions against great pressure. My article Acts of Creation was just accepted by Stone Voices, a spiritually oriented, literary arts journal, no date on publication yet.

Christine: What is a typical day like for you as a writer?

Carla: I’m definitely a morning person and have a ritual that sets my day. I usually get up before dawn, feed the cats, have a cup of coffee, and meditate for 20-30 minutes. I’ve been doing it, in that order, for nearly thirty years. Then I start writing if I have a project, or other work. Several years ago I put Joseph Campbell’s writing practice in place: at least three hours a day. It became automatic, and often the time extends itself without me noticing.

Christine: What interests you about writing fiction?

Carla: I’m most interested in teaching stories. The reader learns or resolves something themselves through identifying with different characters, in the course of being entertained. As the writer, the same is true for me. The process is magical to me. It’s like a movie unfolds in front of me, and I just write it down. It’s particularly surprising when a new character appears to take me somewhere I hadn’t imagined.

Christine: How do you come up with an idea for a new novel?

Carla: The ideas present themselves. It may be something I want to explore myself, or a point I want to get across. Right now I’ve got two different ideas vying for my attention, both well developed. I’m not yet sure which one will win out to focus on first. It would be great to be able to split myself in two!

Christine: Are you traditionally published or self-published? Why did you choose that path?

Carla: I’ve published articles through professional journals and magazines since the early 1990s. When it came to my books, I specifically chose to self-publish through Kenosis Press, my own small press, for these important reasons: 1) they never go out of print; 2) the publishing process is truncated; 3) I have control over the content. Since my books are vehicles for my work, I continue to feel this is important.

Christine: Where can we find your books and websites?

Carla: Find Portals to the Vision Serpent, Standing Stark, and Calling Our Spirits Home on Amazon, or order through local bookstores.

Please note that I donate 10% of profits from book sales to Kenosis Spirit Keepers, the 501(c)3 nonprofit I founded to help us with our projects to preserve Native traditions.

You’re invited to visit Kenosis and Kenosis Spirit Keepers to learn more about offerings and sign up for free material and the Kenosis Inspirations ezine. Follow my blog The Lifepath Dialogues.

Christine: Thanks so much for joining us today, Carla. Your work and your books sound so interesting. Best of luck with your articles and books.

October 20, 2012

The Next Big Thing Blog Hop!

Posted in Books tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 3:16 pm by Christine Rice

Okay, it’s time to take a break from working to get back to blogging :) I have been tagged by Katie S. Pendergrass for The Next Big Thing Blog Hop. The “rules” are to answer 10 questions about my work-in-progress. I have two work-in-progresses, so I will choose Chronicles of a Troubled Girl for this blog hop.

1. What is the working title of your book?
Chronicles of a Troubled Girl: A Collection of Journal Entries

2. Where did the idea come from?
I got the initial idea – to type up all of my journal entries – from my friend and colleague, Katrina Rychling. She said she was planning on typing up her journals, and that gave me the idea to type up and publish mine.

3. What genre does your work-in-progress fall under?
Memoir or compilation.

4. Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?
I would want to be the main character, which is myself :) There are a lot of other people in my book and it would be wonderful if all the original people could play the parts. I’m sure that won’t happen, but I can dream, right? ;)

5. What is a one-sentence synopsis of your book?
Chronicles of a Troubled Girl is a compilation of the author’s journal entries from age nine to age thirty that demonstrates her struggles during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

6. Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?
I will likely be self-publishing it.

7. How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
I started writing the manuscript at the end of January and I am still working on it. I am 4/5 finished with it. I took a few months off due to publishing and marketing my other book and because of other work responsibilities.

8. What other books would you compare this story to within its genre?
Anne Frank’s The Diary of a Young Girl.

9. Who or what inspired you to write this book?
Katrina Rychling. Thanks, Katrina!

10. What else about your book might pique reader’s interest?
There are journal entries about my experiences in a mental hospital and with being homeless.

Those are all of the questions. Now I will choose some people who I’d like to hear about their work-in-progress: Charlene Truxler, Dew Pellucid, Russ Meyer, Theresa Leschmann, and Karen Elizabeth Brown. The “rules” are to answer the same questions, but about your own work-in-progress, and to tag people you know who are authors or writers and possibly working on a manuscript. Have fun!

October 16, 2012

Interview with Olga Vannucci

Posted in Interviews tagged , , , , at 1:46 pm by Christine Rice

Today I will be interviewing Olga Vannucci, an author I met on Book Blogs. Olga Vannucci was born in Italy, lived in Brazil, and came to the U.S. to attend Brown University.  She lives in rural New Jersey with her beloved son, George. She is the author of Travels With George. Let’s start the interview.

Christine: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Olga: When my American son was seven years old, I realized suddenly that I hadn’t been back to my native Italy in ten years, so I went, and took him along. Then I went four more times, and I wrote a book about those trips – a mix of travelogue, personal history, and little anecdotes – in Travels With George.

Christine: What prompted you to write about your experiences in Italy?

Olga: What possessed me? I am a very shy and private person, and I have no idea what possessed me! I think I felt that what I had to say was a little bit different in that I’m both an Italian native and a tourist. What I find interesting is that my friends who have read the book say it sounds just like me. It’s written in the present tense, so it feels like you are along and I’m talking to you.

Christine: What did you find valuable in the experience of writing a memoir?

Olga: One was finding out more about myself. There’s nothing like having to express a thought to help crystallize it! The other is hearing from others about the things that spoke to them in the book, and they range from the more profound to the totally mundane situations. Women will focus on the mothering aspects of the book, dealing with my son. Men enjoy my description of how Italians give directions: they start from a place you’ve never heard of, proceed vaguely, and stop well before your destination. Apparently that’s happened to others…

Christine: How long have you been a writer?

Olga: For about 20 minutes. It feels that way. I’m still getting used to considering myself a writer because this is my first book. I love when people tell me they can relate to something I wrote about, and then I feel like a writer.

Christine: Are you solely a writer or do you have multiple occupations?

Olga: I have a full-time job that involves numbers rather than words. I’m divorced and I write on Sunday afternoons when my son is with his father. I have carved out that time. Having said that, I go through phases: sometimes I write manically and sometimes I set the writing aside for a while until I’m excited to go back to it. It seems to work as a method, at least for me.

Christine: Do you formally plan out your books before you write them?

Olga: I am not a planner at all, things just evolve in my head. That’s how I conduct my life and how I write. With this book, I let it evolve, and then I wrapped it all together around my values, with each of the five trips representing a value, and also at the end I bring back some of the thoughts from the beginning. I tried to really write what was in my head rather than packaging it too neatly.

Christine: What marketing techniques do you use to promote yourself as a writer and your writing?

Olga: Early on, I had an opportunity to read from my book at a gathering of 150 women through an organization called “New Act Women in New Jersey.” If you are as shy as I am, I would not necessarily recommend this large an event. I was extremely nervous, but it went really well. Once I realized it was working – that the audience was listening and responding – I relaxed. I sold a bunch of books right there, and it was a great way to put myself out there and to get an instant response. I realized that my book had appeal, which, as a first-time author, I didn’t know until that point.

Christine: Are you traditionally published or self-published? Why did you choose that path?

Olga: I went with self-publishing because I didn’t have the patience to pursue other publishers. What I like about self-publishing is that it’s all mine – I created the book cover, I chose the font, I am doing all my own promotion – and it’s been incredibly fun and very rewarding. Overall, I’ve been amazed by the options and opportunities – there are so many different ways you can go – and also by all the positive responses and encouragement. It’s a very positive experience.

Christine: What do you like to read?

Olga: I love to read travel memoirs and books about exotic places. I am inspired and awed by writers who put themselves out there, who are able to observe and interpret very different situations, and who can be funny too. Two books I have loved recently are Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller about growing up in Africa, and Running Away to Home by Jennifer Wilson about Croatia.

Christine: Where can we find you and your book?

Olga: I have a small site at www.olgavannucci.com and a Facebook page that I update fairly regularly with pretty pictures of Italy that can be reached via www.travelswithgeorge.com. My book is available on Amazon in both the printed and Kindle versions at www.amazon.com/author/olgavannucci.

Thanks so much for joining us here today, Olga. I wish you continued success with your book.