August 12, 2013

Publishing Accomplishments

Posted in Editing, Freelance Career, Publishing, Self-Publishing tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 7:00 am by Christine Rice

I titled this post “Publishing Accomplishments,” not because I want to share mine, but because I want to help you with yours. Are you a writer? Do you dream of getting your book published? If so, my freelance business, “Christine Rice Publishing Services,” can help you get published, whether your goals are to be traditionally published or self-published. The services I offer will help you during every step of the publishing process. If your goal is to get your book out to the world through the self-publishing medium, I can help you by editing and proofreading your book, formatting your book for print or digital publishing, and designing your book cover. Or, if you’re dying to get a publishing contract with a traditional publisher, I will edit your manuscript so that it will be in tip-top shape; write you a stunning query letter, synopsis, and/or book proposal; and format your manuscript how agents want them (I will even tailor the materials for the agents you wish to submit to since their submission guidelines vary – but you don’t need to worry about that, because I’ll do it all for you!).

Visit Christine Rice Publishing Services to view my resume, review my portfolio, learn what services I offer, and read my client testimonials. You will see that I am the best answer for all your publishing needs. Leave me a message on the “contact me” form on my website and I’ll get back to you right away.

Looking forward to helping you accomplish your publishing goals!

Christine

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June 10, 2012

Review of “How to Write a Great Query Letter”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , at 8:44 pm by Christine Rice

How to Write a Great Query Letter by Noah Lukeman is an excellent reference guide for writing an effective query letter. Lukeman is a long-time literary agent, so he knows what agents want to see in a query letter. He is very detailed about how to properly construct a query letter and he covers all the bases.

In the book, Lukeman talks about the importance of preparation by thoroughly researching agents. He discusses the best and worst query letter formatting techniques. Then he breaks apart the query letter, paragraph by paragraph, and explains key features to include and mistakes to avoid – for both fiction and nonfiction. Lastly, he goes over final issues, including common mistakes writers make with their query letters. The end of the book includes a checklist for writers for when they craft their query letters.

Even though I’m a self-published author, I can see how this book is a great resource for new writers interested in seeking an agent or publisher. It is evident, that by following the suggestions in the book, the writer will develop a highly effective query letter that is clear, concise, and direct, as well as full of the important traits that agents are looking for and free of nonessential information. I highly recommend this book to writers to read before they query any agents or publishers.

This is a free kindle book and can be found here. I hope you will find it useful too.

February 5, 2012

Review of “Get Between the Covers”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:27 pm by Christine Rice

Get Between the Covers: Leave a Legacy by Writing a Book (2nd ed. 2008) is made for all those who are contemplating writing and publishing a book and those who are certain they want to write a book, or have already started, and want to learn about the ins and outs of book publishing. This book motivates writers who want to be authors and it encourages writers to follow their dreams of publishing a book. The main viewpoint of the authors is that there are millions of people who feel they “have a book in them,” but only thousands of books are published each year; so the book’s purpose is to get more people to write that book that they have in them.

The book’s content is not focused on one means of publishing, but rather, it reviews them all. It is very educational about different aspects of the writing and publishing industry, and is an overview of the entire book writing process; but at 356 pages, it explains a lot, and also refers the reader to additional research materials.

It has a preface, introduction, five parts, and appendices. The preface introduces the book and explains how it is different from the first edition. The introduction was written during the first edition and provides research and statistics that support why the book is important and needed by society, explains what types of readers the book is geared towards, describes how the chapters are set up, and provides a brief biography of the authors.

Part 1 is about the book writing process. It is motivational and informative and includes chapters on time management, writer’s block, and editing, as well as several others. Part 2 is an overview of the publishing industry; it includes information on traditional publishers, literary agents, and booksellers. Part 3 goes over the “paths to print.” It explains the different types of book publishing, allowing the reader to decide which method is best for them. Part 4 educates the reader about editors, marketing, and rights and contracts. Part 5 wraps it up with suggestions on rejection and acceptance. Lastly, the appendices cover how to navigate Writer’s Market, and they provide resource links and suggested reading material.

Do I recommend this book? Definitely. It is very helpful and informative for authors, and those who want to write a book, which is where I’m at right now. If you are interested, Get Between the Covers is available in paperback on Amazon for only $6.91! Click here for the link.