January 23, 2013

First draft of “Chronicles of a Troubled Girl” finished!

Posted in Books, Editing, Publishing tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:57 am by Christine Rice

The day after my last post, which was about how I hadn’t worked on my manuscripts in a few months, I resumed working on my work-in-progress: Chronicles of a Troubled Girl. I wrote for one to two hours a day most days, and I’m happy to say that I finished the first draft the other day! It feels great to have completed the writing part of the book project.

The next step is to edit. Since it is a compilation of my journal entries from childhood to adulthood, and I want the book to be as accurate of the times as possible, I will not be doing a lot of editing. I will just review what I have written for spelling and grammar. Since I did that as I typed the journals, there will not be much editing to do. It will be a fairly quick review process and I will only need to go through the manuscript once, since I am also a professional editor.

Lately, I’ve been trying to spend less time on the computer since my body has been feeling stiff and uncomfortable when I sit for too long – due to previous leg injuries. But I’m sure I will begin editing soon. And since my last post motivated me to finish the first draft, I am hoping this post will inspire me to begin editing. I will just need to spend less time online each day so that I’ll be able to spend time editing the manuscript, and I’ll only be able to work on it for an hour at a time so that I can get up and stretch my legs.

I am looking forward to editing Chronicles of a Troubled Girl and moving on with the publishing process and getting it out to the public. I will not be doing a blog tour, since it is a very personal memoir. I prefer that people I know, and those I announce it to, will be the first to read it, and I will allow word-of-mouth to be the main method of marketing.

I hope you all have a joyous day. Happy writing and reading!

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February 5, 2012

Review of “Get Between the Covers”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:27 pm by Christine Rice

Get Between the Covers: Leave a Legacy by Writing a Book (2nd ed. 2008) is made for all those who are contemplating writing and publishing a book and those who are certain they want to write a book, or have already started, and want to learn about the ins and outs of book publishing. This book motivates writers who want to be authors and it encourages writers to follow their dreams of publishing a book. The main viewpoint of the authors is that there are millions of people who feel they “have a book in them,” but only thousands of books are published each year; so the book’s purpose is to get more people to write that book that they have in them.

The book’s content is not focused on one means of publishing, but rather, it reviews them all. It is very educational about different aspects of the writing and publishing industry, and is an overview of the entire book writing process; but at 356 pages, it explains a lot, and also refers the reader to additional research materials.

It has a preface, introduction, five parts, and appendices. The preface introduces the book and explains how it is different from the first edition. The introduction was written during the first edition and provides research and statistics that support why the book is important and needed by society, explains what types of readers the book is geared towards, describes how the chapters are set up, and provides a brief biography of the authors.

Part 1 is about the book writing process. It is motivational and informative and includes chapters on time management, writer’s block, and editing, as well as several others. Part 2 is an overview of the publishing industry; it includes information on traditional publishers, literary agents, and booksellers. Part 3 goes over the “paths to print.” It explains the different types of book publishing, allowing the reader to decide which method is best for them. Part 4 educates the reader about editors, marketing, and rights and contracts. Part 5 wraps it up with suggestions on rejection and acceptance. Lastly, the appendices cover how to navigate Writer’s Market, and they provide resource links and suggested reading material.

Do I recommend this book? Definitely. It is very helpful and informative for authors, and those who want to write a book, which is where I’m at right now. If you are interested, Get Between the Covers is available in paperback on Amazon for only $6.91! Click here for the link.

January 17, 2012

Review of “Starting Your Career as a Freelance Writer”

Posted in Book Reviews tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 1:58 pm by Christine Rice

Allen, Moira. Starting Your Career as a Freelance Writer. 2nd ed. New York: Allworth Press, 2011. 317 pages. $24.95.

I am a freelance writer and I’m in the first year of my career. I have been published online many times and I feel I have learned a lot about freelance writing. However, I recently felt like I was “missing” something in my endeavors, so I picked up Starting Your Career as a Freelance Writer by Moira Allen to learn more about the business of freelance writing and publishing.

My first glance at the table of contents told me it was a book with a lot of information. And that’s just what I needed – a book that covered all the bases.

The sequence of the book is logical, similar to a story, and it has short chapters, which makes the nine parts easy to read. Part one begins with a discussion about what it’s like to be a freelance writer, including how to make time for writing and how to set goals. Part two explains how to write a publishable article, and includes advice on narrowing a topic, making an outline, performing research, conducting interviews, as well as essential tips on how to complete any writing assignment, whether it be an article or a novel. The remaining parts detail various aspects of getting published and the business of writing.

Allen’s advice comes from many years of experience as a writer and an editor; she shares her well-rounded expertise (from having been on both sides of the desk) with the reader. Her writer’s voice resembles that of an experienced colleague who gladly shares her knowledge with the reader in an encouraging, informative, and helpful way. As the author, she is believable, because you can feel the wisdom in her words.

As far as wanting to learn all the ins and outs of freelance writing, well, I did, and I had no questions remaining after I finished the book.

Starting Your Career as a Freelance Writer is going to have a place in my home library, and I’m sure I’ll use it as a guide again and again throughout my career.